Étiquette : digital traces (page 1 of 12)

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“Les mesures de surveillance, via nos usages des technologies, que suggèrent nos gouvernants relèvent en réalité d’une stratégie pour détourner notre attention de la cause réelle du problème que constitue l’abandon de l’hôpital public. Ils tablent sur la culpabilisation des citoyens désireux d’agir pour faire adopter des outils toujours plus intrusifs et évitent soigneusement de mettre en lumière les multiples réseaux de solidarité qui se forment, les besoins criants des associations pour aider les plus précaires, les multiples critiques de notre mode de vie qui émergent même des plus libéraux. Plutôt que d’assumer les conséquences désastreuses d’une politique de santé défaillante, leur diversion consiste à inverser les rôles, à nous faire passer, nous, pour ceux qui refuseront d’aider les autres. Comme si nous devions être coupable de vouloir protéger notre vie privée, d’exprimer notre colère, ou simplement de suggérer des alternatives. ”

Source : Urgence partout, État nul part – La Quadrature du Net

Community Mobility Reports

“ As global communities respond to COVID-19, we’ve heard from public health officials that the same type of aggregated, anonymized insights we use in products such as Google Maps could be helpful as they make critical decisions to combat COVID-19. These Community Mobility Reports aim to provide insights into what has changed in response to policies aimed at combating COVID-19. The reports chart movement trends over time by geography, across different categories of places such as retail and recreation, groceries and pharmacies, parks, transit stations, workplaces, and residential. ”

Source : COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports

Staying at Home During Coronavirus Is a Luxury

“Although people in all income groups are moving less than they did before the crisis, wealthier people are staying home the most, especially during the workweek. Not only that, but in nearly every state, they began doing so days before the poor, giving them a head start on social distancing as the virus spread, according to aggregated data from the location analysis company Cuebiq, which tracks about 15 million cellphone users nationwide daily.”

Source : Location Data Says It All: Staying at Home During Coronavirus Is a Luxury – The New York Times

“Last week Buzzfeed News and the Los Angeles Times featured street-level visualizations of how COVID-19 is affecting traffic patterns in major cities around the world. The visualizations were generated from Mapbox Traffic data. For this post, we dug further into our telemetry data to show how much and where movement and local travel patterns have changed around the globe during the COVID-19 pandemic.”

Source : Where and when local travel decreased from COVID-19 around the world

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“We use telemetry from all Mapbox SDKs to improve our map, directions, travel times, and search. We collect anonymous data about how users interact with the map to help developers build better location based applications. Location telemetry is critical to improving the map. We use the data to discover missing roads, determine turn restrictions, build speed profiles, and improve OpenStreetMap.”

Source : Telemetry | Mapbox

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“On Tuesday, a company called Unacast that collects and analyzes phone GPS location data launched a “Social Distancing Scoreboard” that grades, county by county, which residents are changing behavior at the urging of health officials. It uses the reduction in the total distance we travel as a rough index for whether we’re staying put at home.”

Source : These maps use phone data to track social distancing – The Washington Post

“Les téléphones des Suisses seront ainsi utilisés pour lutter contre la pandémie. Les analyses seront effectuées uniquement dans les espaces publics, et pas, par exemple, dans les immeubles d’habitation ni les locaux d’entreprises. Ces données ne seront pas communiquées en direct à l’Office fédéral de la santé publique (OFSP), mais dans un délai de vingt-quatre heures environ. Les autorités ne sauront pas ce qui se passe en temps réel, mais avec un certain décalage. Le but sera sans doute de déterminer si des rassemblements illégaux ont lieu plusieurs jours de suite dans des endroits publics, afin, ensuite, de prendre des mesures pour les disperser.”

Source : Swisscom aidera la Confédération à détecter les attroupements via les téléphones – Le Temps

“Asking people to choose between privacy and health is, in fact, the very root of the problem. Because this is a false choice. We can and should enjoy both privacy and health. We can choose to protect our health and stop the coronavirus epidemic not by instituting totalitarian surveillance regimes, but rather by empowering citizens. In recent weeks, some of the most successful efforts to contain the coronavirus epidemic were orchestrated by South Korea, Taiwan and Singapore. While these countries have made some use of tracking applications, they have relied far more on extensive testing, on honest reporting, and on the willing co-operation of a well-informed public.”

Source : Yuval Noah Harari: the world after coronavirus | Financial Times

“We’re exploring ways that aggregated anonymized location information could help in the fight against COVID-19. One example could be helping health authorities determine the impact of social distancing, similar to the way we show popular restaurant times and traffic patterns in Google Maps”

Source : Location data gathered by Facebook, Google, other tech companies could be used to battle coronavirus spread – The Washington Post

a woman retrieving info from file catalouge

“For well over a decade, identity thieves, phishers, and other online scammers have created a black market of stolen and aggregated consumer data that they used to break into people’s accounts, steal their money, or impersonate them. In October, dark web researcher Vinny Troia found one such trove sitting exposed and easily accessible on an unsecured server, comprising 4 terabytes of personal information—about 1.2 billion records in all.”

Source : 1.2 Billion Records Found Exposed Online in a Single Server  | WIRED

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