Étiquette : badside (Page 1 of 3)

Uber Ripley

«The Uber HQ team overseeing Ripley could remotely change passwords and otherwise lock up data on company-owned smartphones, laptops, and desktops as well as shut down the devices. This routine was initially called the unexpected visitor protocol. Employees aware of its existence eventually took to calling it Ripley, after Sigourney Weaver’s flamethrower-wielding hero in the Alien movies. The nickname was inspired by a Ripley line in Aliens, after the acid-blooded extraterrestrials easily best a squad of ground troops. ‘Nuke the entire site from orbit. It’s the only way to be sure.’»

Source : Uber’s Secret Tool for Keeping the Cops in the Dark – Bloomberg

«Alphabet Inc.’s Google moved 15.9 billion euros ($19.2 billion) to a Bermuda shell company in 2016, regulatory filings in the Netherlands show — saving the company billions of dollars in taxes that year. Google uses two structures, known as a “Double Irish” and a “Dutch Sandwich,” to shield the majority of its international profits from taxation. The setup involves shifting revenue from one Irish subsidiary to a Dutch company with no employees, and then on to a Bermuda mailbox owned by another Ireland-registered company».

Source : Google’s ‘Dutch Sandwich’ Shielded 16 Billion Euros From Tax – Bloomberg

SilverPush’s company policy is to not « divulge the names of the apps the technology is embedded, » meaning that users have no knowledge of which apps are using this technology and no way to opt-out of this practice. As of April of 2015, SilverPush’s software is used by 67 apps and the company monitors 18 million smartphones.
SilverPush’s ultrasonic cross-device tracking was publicly reported as long ago as July 2014. More recently, the company received a new round of publicity when it obtained $1.25 million in venture capital. The CDT letter appears to be the first time the privacy-invading potential of the company’s product has been discussed in detail. SilverPush officials didn’t respond to e-mail seeking comment for this article.

Source : Beware of ads that use inaudible sound to link your phone, TV, tablet, and PC | Ars Technica

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