Étiquette : targeted advertising (Page 1 of 6)

Payer pour éviter les cookies publicitaires, est-ce légal ?

Cookies Numerama

“Est-ce légal de demander aux internautes de payer une petite somme chaque mois, par exemple deux euros, pour ne pas avoir de cookies publicitaires ? C’est en quelque sorte la question qui est en train d’émerger, notamment sur les réseaux sociaux. En effet, des internautes ont été interloqués de voir qu’en se rendant sur des sites, il peut leur être demandé de payer pour échapper à la publicité ciblée.”

Source : Payer pour éviter les cookies publicitaires, est-ce légal ?

Google charts a course towards a more privacy-first web

Article's hero media

“Advances in aggregation, anonymization, on-device processing and other privacy-preserving technologies offer a clear path to replacing individual identifiers. In fact, our latest tests of FLoC show one way to effectively take third-party cookies out of the advertising equation and instead hide individuals within large crowds of people with common interests. Chrome intends to make FLoC-based cohorts available for public testing through origin trials with its next release this month, and we expect to begin testing FLoC-based cohorts with advertisers in Google Ads in Q2. Chrome also will offer the first iteration of new user controls in April and will expand on these controls in future releases, as more proposals reach the origin trial stage, and they receive more feedback from end users and the industry. This points to a future where there is no need to sacrifice relevant advertising and monetization in order to deliver a private and secure experience. ”

Source : Google charts a course towards a more privacy-first web

Facebook Just Admitted It Has Lost the Battle With Apple Over Privacy

“The company won’t stop Facebook from tracking you, but it will have to ask you for permission first. Why, then, is Facebook so worried? Because it knows what everyone else already knows–that when given a choice, most people will choose to not allow Facebook to track them. If that happens to be bad for Facebook’s business, that isn’t Apple’s fault. It just means that Facebook’s business model is based on something most people would prefer it didn’t do.Except, small businesses can still advertise to their customers. They can still use all of the information Facebook knows about its users–like their gender, age, location, and interests, to show ads. If you’re a small business, none of that changes. The only person that really stands to lose seems to be Facebook. ”

Source : Facebook Just Admitted It Has Lost the Battle With Apple Over Privacy | Inc.com

http://www.beaude.net/no-flux/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/1x-1.jpg

“The new report argues that YouTube hasn’t done enough. Researchers collected more than 1,600 videos from 191 parents that their children, all younger than 8, watched on YouTube’s main site this year. Among the findings: Ads were present on 95% of the videos in the study. A fifth of the ads were categorized as age inappropriate — a bourbon commercial on a nail painting video for girls; another ad, during a video game clip, that asked, “should the U.S. deport illegal immigrants?””

Source : Kids on YouTube See Many Ads, Few Educational Videos: Study – Bloomberg

Full Third-Party Cookie Blocking and More | WebKit

“Safari continues to pave the way for privacy on the web, this time as the first mainstream browser to fully block third-party cookies by default. As far as we know, only the Tor Browser has featured full third-party cookie blocking by default before Safari, but Brave just has a few exceptions left in its blocking so in practice they are in the same good place. We know Chrome wants this behavior too and they announced that they’ll be shipping it by 2022.”

Source : Full Third-Party Cookie Blocking and More | WebKit

Webxray

“By default, Homebrew sends information to Google Analytics, you can disable that with the following command using the terminal (which you should have open after installing Homebrew): brew analytics off”

Source : webxray

How top health websites are sharing sensitive data with advertisers

A network diagram showing how ad tracker patterns vary for the same website from country to country. Using the example of health.com, it shows 113 nodes with 246 connections in the US, but only 39 nodes and 39 connections in the UK

“The data shared included:

  • drug names entered into Drugs.com were sent to Google’s ad unit DoubleClick.
  • symptoms inputted into WebMD’s symptom checker, and diagnoses received, including “drug overdose”, were shared with Facebook.
  • menstrual and ovulation cycle information from BabyCentre ended up with Amazon Marketing, among others.
  • keywords such as “heart disease” and “considering abortion” were shared from sites like the British Heart Foundation, Bupa and Healthline to companies including Scorecard Research and Blue Kai (owned by software giant Oracle).

In eight cases (with the exception of Healthline and Mind), a specific identifier linked to the web browser was also transmitted — potentially allowing the information to be tied to an individual — and tracker cookies were dropped before consent was given. Healthline confirmed that it also shared unique identifiers with third parties.

None of the websites tested asked for this type of explicit and detailed consent.”

Source : How top health websites are sharing sensitive data with advertisers | Financial Times

“We recently discovered that when you provided an email address or phone number for safety or security purposes (for example, two-factor authentication) this data may have inadvertently been used for advertising purposes, specifically in our Tailored Audiences and Partner Audiences advertising system. ”

Source : Personal information and ads on Twitter

Black Like

“Earlier this week, The Intercept was able to select “white genocide conspiracy theory” as a pre-defined “detailed targeting” criterion on the social network to promote two articles to an interest group that Facebook pegged at 168,000 users large and defined as “people who have expressed an interest or like pages related to White genocide conspiracy theory.” The paid promotion was approved by Facebook’s advertising wing. After we contacted the company for comment, Facebook promptly deleted the targeting category, apologized, and said it should have never existed in the first place.”

Source : Facebook Allowed Advertisers to Target Users Interested in “White Genocide” — Even in Wake of Pittsburgh Massacre

« Older posts

© 2021 no-Flux

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑