Étiquette : video games (Page 2 of 5)

“After training our agents for an additional week, we played against MaNa, one of the world’s strongest StarCraft II players, and among the 10 strongest Protoss players. AlphaStar again won by 5 games to 0, demonstrating strong micro and macro-strategic skills. “I was impressed to see AlphaStar pull off advanced moves and different strategies across almost every game, using a very human style of gameplay I wouldn’t have expected,” he said. “I’ve realised how much my gameplay relies on forcing mistakes and being able to exploit human reactions, so this has put the game in a whole new light for me. We’re all excited to see what comes next.”

Source : AlphaStar: Mastering the Real-Time Strategy Game StarCraft II | DeepMind

“ Cette année, Roblox devrait verser 70 millions de dollars à sa communauté de créateurs, plus du double de l’année précédente. Une logique qui a déjà permis à des codeurs de 13 ans de gagner près de 100 000 dollars… par mois. Joueurs ou créateurs, tout le monde semble y trouver son compte, peu importe l’apparente simplicité des jeux proposés. Pour comprendre ce qui fait le succès de Roblox, nous sommes allés à la rencontre de sa communauté française.”

Source : Des dessins moches, des jeux simplistes et 178 millions d’adeptes : pourquoi Roblox a tant de succès ?

“The idea of streaming such graphically-rich content that requires near-instant interaction between the game controller and the graphics on the screen poses a number of challenges.  When streaming TV or movies, consumers are comfortable with a few seconds of buffering at the start, but streaming high-quality games requires latency measured in milliseconds, with no graphic degradation.”

Source : Pushing the limits of streaming technology

“If you haven’t heard of Ninja, ask the nearest 12-year-old. He shot to fame in March after he and Drake played Fortnite, the video game phenomenon in which 100 players are dropped onto an island and battle to be the last one standing while building forts that are used to both attack and hide from opponents. At its peak, Ninja and Drake’s game, which also featured rapper Travis Scott and Pittsburgh Steelers receiver JuJu Smith-Schuster, pulled in 630,000 concurrent viewers on Twitch, Amazon’s livestreaming platform, shattering the previous record of 388,000. Since then, Ninja has achieved what no other gamer has before: mainstream fame. With 11 million Twitch followers and climbing, he commands an audience few can dream of. In April, he logged the most social media interactions in the entire sports world, beating out the likes of Cristiano Ronaldo, Shaquille O’Neal and Neymar”.

Source : Fortnite legend Ninja is living the stream

loss-1

“OpenAI Five lost two games against top Dota 2 players at The International in Vancouver this week, maintaining a good chance of winning for the first 20-35 minutes of both games”.

Source : The International 2018: Results

“In October of 1958, Physicist William Higinbotham created Pong, which is thought to be the world’s first video game. Since then, video games have become part of mainstream culture, and every so often a transcendent game comes out, like Pac-Man or World of Warcraft, that brings in billions in revenue. Released in July of 2017, Fortnite may be on track to become that kind of game.
Fortnite, a cooperative survival game, ​has gone viral on a global scale in 2018. The game itself is free to download, which makes it particularly appealing, but it makes its money through in-game purchases that players have the option to buy. In fact, an April report by analytics firm Sensor Tower found that Fortnite was making an average of $1 million every single day from player spending”.

Source : The Finances of Fortnite | LendEDU

“Our team of five neural networks, OpenAI Five, has started to defeat amateur human teams at Dota 2. While today we play with restrictions, we aim to beat a team of top professionals at The International in August subject only to a limited set of heroes. We may not succeed: Dota 2 is one of the most popular and complex esports games in the world, with creative and motivated professionals who train year-round to earn part of Dota’s annual $40M prize pool.
OpenAI Five plays 180 years worth of games against itself every day, learning via self-play. It trains using a scaled-up version of Proximal Policy Optimization running on 256 GPUs and 128,000 CPU cores — a larger-scale version of the system we built to play the much-simpler solo variant of the game last year. Using a separate LSTM for each hero and no human data, it learns recognizable strategies. This indicates that reinforcement learning can yield long-term planning with large but achievable scale — without fundamental advances, contrary to our own expectations upon starting the project”.

Source : OpenAI Five

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