Internet Access in the World

“The slowdown is described in an analysis of UN data that will be published next month by the Web Foundation, an organisation set up by the inventor of the world wide web, Sir Tim Berners-Lee. The data shows that growth in global internet access dropped from 19% in 2007 to less than 6% last year.”

Source : Exclusive: dramatic slowdown in global growth of internet access | Technology | The Guardian

Uber Works

“Uber is developing a new short-term staffing business, dubbed Uber Works, that would help to diversify its business ahead of next year’s planned initial public offering. Uber hopes to apply its “on-demand” model and large database of contractors to provide a temporary workforce for events and corporate functions, such as waiters or security guards.”

Source : Uber takes a detour with plan to provide temporary staff | Financial Times

Winamp

“While Saboundjian declined to get into the specifics of which services would be part of the new Winamp or how the app would plug into, say, your Spotify playlists, your Google Music library, your Podcasts app, Audible and so on, he seemed confident that it would meet the needs he outlined. There are many conversations underway, he said, but licensing and agreements aren’t the main difficulty, and of course release is still quite a ways out. The team has focused on creating a consistent app across every platform you might want encounter mobile audio. A highly improved search will also play a role — as it ought to, when your media is all lumped into one place.”

Source : Winamp returns in 2019 to whip the llama’s ass harder than ever | TechCrunch

Sénateur de Virginie Mark Warner

“Est-ce que les Etats-Unis ont repéré, durant la campagne actuelle pour les élections de mi-mandat, une activité de propagande étrangère semblable à celle de 2016 ? Il y a encore de l’activité. Cela n’est pas forcément pour appeler directement à voter pour le candidat X ou le candidat Y, mais ils essaient encore de diviser les Américains sur les questions sociales, de race… parce que ça marche, et cela ne coûte pas cher : si vous additionnez tout ce qu’ils ont dépensé pour interférer dans l’élection américaine et en Europe, cela coûte moins qu’un avion de combat F-35. C’est un sujet dont l’Occident doit prendre conscience.”

Source : La propagande numérique de la Russie « a coûté moins cher qu’un avion F-35 »

Facebook Portal Kitchen

“The biggest question surrounding the device: Why should anyone trust Facebook enough to put Facebook-powered microphones and video cameras in their living room or kitchen? Given Facebook’s year of privacy and security issues, privacy around the device — including what data Facebook collects and how it’s used — has been an important part of the story surrounding Portal.”

Source : It turns out that Facebook could in fact use data collected from its Portal in-home video device to target you with ads – Recode

“In a world where surveillance technology is being deployed everywhere from airports and stadiums to public schools and hotels and raising a plethora of privacy concerns, it’s perhaps inevitable that farms on land and at sea would find ways to exploit it to improve productivity. Just this year, American agribusiness giant Cargill Inc. said it was working with an Irish tech start-up on a facial-recognition system to monitor cows so farmers can adjust feeding regimens to enhance milk production. Scanners will allow them to track food and water intake and even detect when females are having fertile days. Salmon farming may be next in line. As fish vies with beef and chicken as the global protein food of choice, exporters like Norway, the world’s biggest producer of the pinkish-orange fish, have become the focal point for radical marine-farming methods designed to help the $232 billion aquaculture industry feed the world.”

Source : Salmon Farmers Are Scanning Fish Faces to Fight Killer Lice – Bloomberg

“When we use data to create better experiences for you, we work hard to do it in a way that doesn’t compromise your privacy. One example is our pioneering use of Differential Privacy, where we scramble your data and combine it with the data of millions of others. So we see general patterns, rather than specifics that could be traced back to you. These patterns help us identify things like the most popular emoji, the best QuickType suggestions, and energy consumption rates in Safari.”

Source : Privacy – Apple

“Piano Genie is in some ways reminiscent of video games such as Rock Band and Guitar Hero that are accessible to novice musicians, with the crucial difference that users can freely improvise on Piano Genie rather than re-enacting songs from a fixed repertoire. You can try it out yourself via our interactive web demo!”

Source : Piano Genie: An Intelligent Musical Interface

Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi

“Uber Technologies Inc. recently received proposals from Wall Street banks valuing the ride-hailing company at as much as $120 billion in an initial public offering that could take place early next year, according to people familiar with the matter.That eye-popping figure is nearly double Uber’s valuation in a fundraising round two months ago and more than General Motors Co. , Ford Motor Co. and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV are worth combined.”

Source : Uber Proposals Value Company at $120 Billion in a Possible IPO – WSJ

“Under the new law, all new internet-connected devices made or sold in California with a default password will be required to make that password unique and secure for every single device. That means no more devices shipped with username/password combos of “admin/admin,” for example. It’s far from a panacea—and really, why aren’t you using a password manager already—but it’s a step towards at least a minimal baseline of security in our internet-of-things addled future.”

Source : California Is Making It Illegal for Devices to Have Shitty Default Passwords – Motherboard

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