Étiquette : geolocation (Page 2 of 7)

“Les téléphones des Suisses seront ainsi utilisés pour lutter contre la pandémie. Les analyses seront effectuées uniquement dans les espaces publics, et pas, par exemple, dans les immeubles d’habitation ni les locaux d’entreprises. Ces données ne seront pas communiquées en direct à l’Office fédéral de la santé publique (OFSP), mais dans un délai de vingt-quatre heures environ. Les autorités ne sauront pas ce qui se passe en temps réel, mais avec un certain décalage. Le but sera sans doute de déterminer si des rassemblements illégaux ont lieu plusieurs jours de suite dans des endroits publics, afin, ensuite, de prendre des mesures pour les disperser.”

Source : Swisscom aidera la Confédération à détecter les attroupements via les téléphones – Le Temps

Your Smartphone’s Location Data Is Worth Big Money to Wall Street

http://www.beaude.net/no-flux/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/B3-CG169_THASOS_M_20181101165453.jpg

“When Tesla Chief Executive Elon Musk said the car maker would work around the clock to boost production of its Model 3 sedan, the number crunchers at Thasos Group decided to watch. They circled Tesla’s 370 acres in Fremont, Calif., on an online map, creating a digital corral to isolate smartphone location signals that emanated from within it. Thasos, which leases databases of trillions of geographic coordinates collected by smartphone apps, set its computers to find the pings created at Tesla’s factory, then shared the data with its hedge-fund clients, showing the overnight shift swelled 30% from June to October. Last week, many on Wall Street were surprised when Tesla disclosed a rare quarterly profit, the result of Model 3 production that had nearly doubled in three months. Shares shot up 9.1% the next day.”

Source : Your Smartphone’s Location Data Is Worth Big Money to Wall Street – WSJ

“There is the next frontier in political advertising: your personal location data, collected from apps you’ve downloaded that then take this sensitive information and sell it to third parties — including political campaigns. Love it or hate it, digital strategists see this location data as part of the future of political campaigns, as candidates and advocacy groups harness your personal whereabouts and leverage it to try to win your support. One campaign might know if you’ve passed by one of their lawn signs recently. Another might track whether you’ve been in a specific Catholic church in Dubuque, Iowa. Forces behind Trump, who three years ago said he considered data to be “overrated” in politics, are exploring this next iteration of digital campaign tools. And with the incumbent president’s vastly superior resources and innate appetite for digital experimentation, many leading Democrats are concerned that it is the GOP — not the digitally pioneering party of Barack Obama — that is mastering Silicon Valley’s tricks ahead of what’s expected to be the most expensive US presidential election ever.”

Source : How Trump allies are using your phone’s location to try and win your vote – Vox

The iPhone 11’s U1 chip necessitates constant geolocation checks

Multiple smartphones on table.

“ Ultra-wideband technology is an industry-standard technology and is subject to international regulatory requirements that require it to be turned off in certain locations… iOS uses Location Services to help determine if iPhone is in these prohibited locations in order to disable ultra-wideband and comply with regulations… The management of ultra-wideband compliance and its use of location data is done entirely on the device, and Apple is not collecting user location data. When Apple introduced the iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro this fall, it included a new chip called the U1 that enables ultra-wideband (UWB) for locating other devices in immediate proximity. Presently, it is only used for the phone’s AirDrop file-sharing feature, but it is expected to be used for other features such as augmented reality and the company’s rumored upcoming Tile competitor in the future. The brief flash of controversy on Twitter and tech blogs over this issue illustrates the challenges Apple faces with its privacy-oriente”

Source : The iPhone 11’s U1 chip necessitates constant geolocation checks, Apple says | Ars Technica

“Netflix would’ve avoided this controversy if it had plainly told subscribers what it was doing somewhere in the app or with a notification. Instead, people discovered that Netflix was utilizing Android’s physical activity permission, which is strange behavior from a video streaming app. In some instances, it was doing this without asking users to approve the move first, as was the case for The Next Web’s Ivan Mehta. You’ve got to be transparent if you want to monitor anyone’s movements.”

Source : Netflix explains why it snuck a physical activity tracker onto some phones – The Verge

« Older posts Newer posts »

© 2021 no-Flux

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑