Étiquette : privacy by design (Page 1 of 2)

96% of US users opt out of app tracking in iOS 14.5, analytics find | Ars Technica

The Facebook iPhone app asks for permission to track the user in this early mock-up of the prompt made by Apple.

“It seems that in the United States, at least, app developers and advertisers who rely on targeted mobile advertising for revenue are seeing their worst fears realized: Analytics data published this week suggests that US users choose to opt out of tracking 96 percent of the time in the wake of iOS 14.5.”

Source : 96% of US users opt out of app tracking in iOS 14.5, analytics find | Ars Technica

Google charts a course towards a more privacy-first web

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“Advances in aggregation, anonymization, on-device processing and other privacy-preserving technologies offer a clear path to replacing individual identifiers. In fact, our latest tests of FLoC show one way to effectively take third-party cookies out of the advertising equation and instead hide individuals within large crowds of people with common interests. Chrome intends to make FLoC-based cohorts available for public testing through origin trials with its next release this month, and we expect to begin testing FLoC-based cohorts with advertisers in Google Ads in Q2. Chrome also will offer the first iteration of new user controls in April and will expand on these controls in future releases, as more proposals reach the origin trial stage, and they receive more feedback from end users and the industry. This points to a future where there is no need to sacrifice relevant advertising and monetization in order to deliver a private and secure experience. ”

Source : Google charts a course towards a more privacy-first web

Facebook Just Admitted It Has Lost the Battle With Apple Over Privacy

“The company won’t stop Facebook from tracking you, but it will have to ask you for permission first. Why, then, is Facebook so worried? Because it knows what everyone else already knows–that when given a choice, most people will choose to not allow Facebook to track them. If that happens to be bad for Facebook’s business, that isn’t Apple’s fault. It just means that Facebook’s business model is based on something most people would prefer it didn’t do.Except, small businesses can still advertise to their customers. They can still use all of the information Facebook knows about its users–like their gender, age, location, and interests, to show ads. If you’re a small business, none of that changes. The only person that really stands to lose seems to be Facebook. ”

Source : Facebook Just Admitted It Has Lost the Battle With Apple Over Privacy | Inc.com

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“Decentralized Privacy-Preserving Proximity Tracing This repository contains a proposal for a secure and decentralized privacy-preserving proximity tracing system. Its goal is to simplify and accelerate the process of identifying people who have been in contact with an infected person, thus providing a technological foundation to help slow the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The system aims to minimise privacy and security risks for individuals and communities and guarantee the highest level of data protection.”

Source : GitHub – DP-3T/documents: Decentralized Privacy-Preserving Proximity Tracing — Documents

“Our team at MIT, working with partners from around the world, has developed a system for identifying people at risk of infecting COVID-19, by using the Bluetooth signals that our cell phones send each other. Privacy is a bedrock value so our system can notify individuals of potential contacts without revealing any private information to other individuals, the government, health care providers, or cell service providers.”

Source : PACT: Private Automated Contact Tracing

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“In principle, the concept of a « Corona App » involves an enormous risk due to the contact and health data that may be collected. At the same time, there is a chance for « privacy-by-design » concepts and technologies that have been developed by the crypto and privacy community over the last decades. With the help of these technologies, it is possible to unfold the epidemilogical potential of contact tracing without creating a privacy disaster. For this reason alone, all concepts that violate or even endanger privacy must be strictly rejected. In the following, we outline social and technical minimum requirements for such technologies. The CCC sees itself in an advisory and observation role in this debate. We will not recommend specific apps, concepts or procedures. We however advise against the use of apps that do not meet these requirements.”

Source : CCC | 10 requirements for the evaluation of « Contact Tracing » apps

“When we use data to create better experiences for you, we work hard to do it in a way that doesn’t compromise your privacy. One example is our pioneering use of Differential Privacy, where we scramble your data and combine it with the data of millions of others. So we see general patterns, rather than specifics that could be traced back to you. These patterns help us identify things like the most popular emoji, the best QuickType suggestions, and energy consumption rates in Safari.”

Source : Privacy – Apple

“Under the new law, all new internet-connected devices made or sold in California with a default password will be required to make that password unique and secure for every single device. That means no more devices shipped with username/password combos of “admin/admin,” for example. It’s far from a panacea—and really, why aren’t you using a password manager already—but it’s a step towards at least a minimal baseline of security in our internet-of-things addled future.”

Source : California Is Making It Illegal for Devices to Have Shitty Default Passwords – Motherboard

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