Étiquette : hypercentrality (Page 1 of 19)

L’Éducation Nationale officialise l’arrêt du déploiement d’Office 365 et de Google for Education dans les écoles

L’Éducation Nationale officialise l’arrêt du déploiement d’Office 365 et de Google for Education dans les écoles

“À l’origine, Philippe Latombe pointait dans sa question que l’offre gratuite de Microsoft « s’apparente à une forme ultime de dumping et à de la concurrence déloyale. Il semble par ailleurs qu’aucun appel d’offres n’ait eu lieu ».  Dans sa réponse, le ministère explique que les offres gratuites sont «exclues du champ de la commande publique » même s’il concède qu’ « il est vraisemblable que la mise à disposition gratuite des établissements scolaires d’une suite bureautique vise à inciter un public qui aurait été accoutumé à l’utilisation de ces outils à souscrire par la suite à la version payante de son offre ».”

Source : L’Éducation Nationale officialise l’arrêt du déploiement d’Office 365 et de Google for Education dans les écoles

How to leave Google apps behind

A broken Google G and a broken ball-and-chain next to it, representing liberation from Google

“There are many reasons you might want to move away from Google, especially in light of some of the recent policy changes regarding Workspaces. Depending on your exact reasons for leaving, there are more or less attractive alternatives to some of Google’s most popular apps. In particular, those can be divided into online web services that, similar to Google, give you access to services via an online account, and self-hosted options like NextCloud and/or apps that can be installed on your own infrastructure, or using instances of your own infrastructure on cloud hosting or web hosting services. These options are attractive for the fact that they allow you to control your own data and maintain the protection of your data. Migrating to these services can be quite easy, whether for email, file sharing, or other services. With these services, it all starts with your domain name.”

Source : How to leave Google apps behind

Is Firefox OK?

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“Mozilla is pushing companies to be more private, and its key product is different at its core. The browser market is dominated by Google’s Chromium codebase and its underlying browser engine, Blink, the component that turns code into visual web pages. Microsoft’s Edge Browser, Brave, Vivaldi, and Opera all use adapted versions of Chromium. Apple makes developers use its WebKit browser engine on iOS. Other than that, Firefox’s Gecko browser engine is the only alternative in existence.“This market needs variety,” Willemsen says. If Firefox diminishes further, there’ll be less competition for Chrome. “We need that difference for open internet standards, for the sake of preventing monopolies,” Willemsen says. Others agree. Everyone we spoke with for this story—inside and outside of Mozilla—says having Firefox flourish makes the web a better place. The trick is figuring out how to get there.”

Source : Is Firefox OK? | WIRED

Jack Dorsey: I’m ‘Partially to Blame’ for Centralizing the Internet

“Twitter founder Jack Dorsey said on Saturday he partially blames himself for the state of the internet today. « The days of usenet, irc, the web…even email (w PGP)…were amazing, » Dorsey said in a tweet, referring to certain online communication systems that date back to the early days of the internet. « Centralizing discovery and identity into corporations really damaged the internet. » « I realize I’m partially to blame, and regret it, » Dorsey continued.

Dorsey, who co-founded Twitter in 2006 and served as its CEO before resigning in November, has previously supported decentralizing the internet.”

Source : Jack Dorsey: I’m ‘Partially to Blame’ for Centralizing the Internet

More details about the October 4 outage – Facebook Engineering

More details about the Oct. 4 Facebook outage

“One of the jobs performed by our smaller facilities is to respond to DNS queries. DNS is the address book of the internet, enabling the simple web names we type into browsers to be translated into specific server IP addresses. Those translation queries are answered by our authoritative name servers that occupy well known IP addresses themselves, which in turn are advertised to the rest of the internet via another protocol called the border gateway protocol (BGP).
To ensure reliable operation, our DNS servers disable those BGP advertisements if they themselves can not speak to our data centers, since this is an indication of an unhealthy network connection. In the recent outage the entire backbone was removed from operation, making these locations declare themselves unhealthy and withdraw those BGP advertisements. The end result was that our DNS servers became unreachable even though they were still operational. This made it impossible for the rest of the internet to find our servers.
All of this happened very fast. And as our engineers worked to figure out what was happening and why, they faced two large obstacles: first, it was not possible to access our data centers through our normal means because their networks were down, and second, the total loss of DNS broke many of the internal tools we’d normally use to investigate and resolve outages like this.”

Source : More details about the October 4 outage – Facebook Engineering

Searching for Wikipedia – [[WM:TECHBLOG]]

File:Wikipedia search referrals dashboard.png

“How people use Search to access Wikipedia is a common question by researchers. Until now, however, there has been little data available about this relationship. To help address these questions, the Wikimedia Foundation is releasing a new, faceted dataset on search engine traffic to Wikipedia so you can ask questions like “What is the most common search engine in my country?” or “Which search engine is most-used by Android users?””

Source : Searching for Wikipedia – [[WM:TECHBLOG]]

IETF | Innovative New Technology for Sending Data Over the Internet Published as Open Standard

QUIC badge

“Already used by a range of Internet services, an initial version of QUIC was designed and tested by Google and then proposed to IETF for standardization. Over the past 5 years it was reviewed, redesigned and improved in the IETF, incorporating a broad range of input from across the industry. QUIC is an important example of a range of innovation in core Internet technologies underway in the IETF. While QUIC is a general transport protocol, the IETF will also soon release HTTP/3, the first application protocol designed for use over QUIC.”

Source : IETF | Innovative New Technology for Sending Data Over the Internet Published as Open Standard

The Smoking Gun in the Facebook Antitrust Case

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“The most revealing insight comes from the summer of 2011, when the company was gearing up to fend off the threat of Google’s rival platform, Google+. The complaint quotes an email in which Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg wrote, “For the first time, we have real competition and consumers have real choice … we will have to be better to win.” At the time, Facebook had been planning to remove users’ ability to untag themselves in photos. One unnamed executive suggested pumping the brakes. “If ever there was a time to AVOID controversy, it would be when the world is comparing our offerings to G+,” they wrote. Better, they suggested, to save such changes “until the direct competitive comparisons begin to die down.” This is close to a smoking gun: evidence that, as Srinivasan hypothesized, Facebook preserves user privacy when it fears competition and degrades privacy when it doesn’t.”

Source : The Smoking Gun in the Facebook Antitrust Case | WIRED

La Californie attaque elle aussi le monopole de Google en justice

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“Le ministère l’accuse ainsi de forcer les consommateurs et les annonceurs à utiliser ses services sur les appareils sous Android via des applis qu’il est impossible d’effacer (comme Google Maps), ce qui restreint considérablement la concurrence. Pour rappel, Google avait écopé d’une amende de 4,3 milliards d’euros en 2018 de la part des autorités européennes de la concurrence pour pratiques déloyales dans l’écosystème Android, afin de renforcer sa position dominante, notamment dans le domaine de la recherche sur internet.”

Source : La Californie attaque elle aussi le monopole de Google en justice

The FTC seeks to break up Facebook

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After writing about the potential breakup of Facebook for years, it’s somewhat surreal for me to see the prospect actually arrive. But it’s here: the Federal Trade Commission voted 3-2 to sue Facebook for illegally maintaining a monopoly in social networking, arguing it has used acquisitions and harsh restrictions on third-party developers to prevent competitors from ever gaining a foothold.

If successful, the FTC’s case — which was joined by 46 states, the District of Columbia, and Guam — could force the company to divest itself of Instagram and WhatsApp, radically reshaping the digital economy. The move comes less than six weeks after the Department of Justice filed an antitrust lawsuit accusing Google of also maintaining an illegally monopoly on search.

“For nearly a decade, Facebook has used its dominance and monopoly power to crush smaller rivals and snuff out competition, all at the expense of everyday users,” said Letitia James, New York’s attorney general. “Today, we are taking action to stand up for the millions of consumers and many small businesses that have been harmed by Facebook’s illegal behavior.”

Source : The FTC seeks to break up Facebook – Platformer

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