Étiquette : surveillance (Page 1 of 16)

This Anti-Tracking Tool Checks If You’re Being Followed

https://i0.wp.com/www.beaude.net/no-flux/wp-content/uploads/2022/11/tracking_hack_Sec_IMG_8908.jpg?resize=676%2C902&ssl=1

“Edmondson has no plans to make the device into a commercial product, but he says the design could easily be copied and reused by anyone with some technical knowledge. Many of the parts involved are easy to obtain or may be lying around the homes of people in tech communities.
Ultimately, he says, the tech community needs to take tech-enabled tracking and surveillance more seriously. “It was really kind of disheartening and depressing to look at the ratio of tools to spy on people versus tools to help you not get spied on,” he says, adding that a person close to him has been the victim of a stalker in the past. In the case of his clandestine friend in another government department, the anti-tracking device was useful. “It was really designed to help someone who came to me asking for help,” he says. Fortunately for Edmondson’s friend (and his source), they used it in the real world, and the device didn’t find anyone following them.”

Source : This Anti-Tracking Tool Checks If You’re Being Followed | WIRED

Planting Tiny Spy Chips in Hardware Can Cost as Little as $200

https://media.wired.com/photos/5d9e68fa0983b500093483ba/master/w_1280

“Both Elkins and Hudson argue that hardware-based espionage via supply-chain hijacking is a technical reality, and one that may be easier to accomplish than many of the world’s security administrators realize. « What I want people to recognize is that chipping implants are not imaginary. They’re relatively straightforward, » says Elkins. « If I can do this, someone with hundreds of millions in their budget has been doing this for a while. »”

Source : Planting Tiny Spy Chips in Hardware Can Cost as Little as $200 | WIRED

Cloud souverain : la stratégie du chaos

CloudActFailure

“La loi extraterritoriale américaine FISA -pour Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act-, totalement ignorée par la communication gouvernementale et celle de Bleu et de S3ns, a pourtant été spécialement conçue pour les entreprises non-américaines. De plus, FISA s’applique au cloud, et permet aux services de renseignement américains de déposer des « backdoors » (portes dérobées) sur tout logiciel américain pour accéder aux données s’ils le souhaitent”

Source : Cloud souverain : la stratégie du chaos

“Google has yanked dozens of apps from its Google Play store after determining that they include a software element that surreptitiously harvests data.The Panamanian company that wrote the code, Measurement Systems S. de R.L., is linked through corporate records and web registrations to a Virginia defense contractor that does cyberintelligence, network-defense and intelligence-intercept work for U.S. national-security agencies.The code ran on millions of Android devices and has been found inside several Muslim prayer apps that have been downloaded more than 10 million times, as well as a highway-speed-trap detection app, a QR-code reading app and a number of other popular consumer apps, according to two researchers who discovered the behavior of the code in the course of auditing work they do searching for vulnerabilities in Android apps. They shared their findings with Google, a unit of Alphabet Inc., federal privacy regulators and The Wall Street Journal.”

Source : Google Bans Apps With Hidden Data-Harvesting Software – WSJ

Joint Statement on Trans-Atlantic Data Privacy Framework

“The European Commission and the United States announce that they have agreed in principle on a new Trans-Atlantic Data Privacy Framework, which will foster trans-Atlantic data flows and address the concerns raised by the Court of Justice of the European Union in the Schrems II decision of July 2020.  The new Framework marks an unprecedented commitment on the U.S. side to implement reforms that will strengthen the privacy and civil liberties protections applicable to U.S. signals intelligence activities.  Under the Trans-Atlantic Data Privacy Framework, the United States is to put in place new safeguards to ensure that signals surveillance activities are necessary and proportionate in the pursuit of defined national security objectives, establish a two-level independent redress mechanism with binding authority to direct remedial measures, and enhance rigorous and layered oversight of signals intelligence activities to ensure compliance with limitations on surveillance activities.”

Source : Joint Statement on Trans-Atlantic Data Privacy Framework

« The facial recognition company Clearview AI is telling investors it is on track to have 100 billion facial photos in its database within a year, enough to ensure “almost everyone in the world will be identifiable,” according to a financial presentation from December obtained by The Washington Post.

And the company wants to expand beyond scanning faces for the police, saying in the presentation that it could monitor “gig economy” workers and is researching a number of new technologies that could identify someone based on how they walk, detect their location from a photo or scan their fingerprints from afar ».

Source : Clearview AI predicts 100 billion photos will give it worldwide facial recognition ability – The Washington Post

We need to talk about how Apple is normalising surveillance

“When it comes to privacy, iOS arguably has a better reputation among consumers than Android, as does Siri vs Alexa, and Safari vs Chrome. But that doesn’t give Apple permission to track our lived experience at all times with its microphones, cameras and sensors. Apple’s groundbreaking devices are pushing the limits of what technology companies can track, and that is not good news for privacy. Thanks to Apple, physical shops can track us through our phones, hackers can potentially access our most sensitive health and biometric details, and now it has developed a technology that can scan content that was supposed to be encrypted. Apple has been playing two games at once – protecting privacy and developing surveillance tools – while only acknowledging the former.”

Source : We need to talk about how Apple is normalising surveillance | WIRED UK

Delays Aren’t Good Enough—Apple Must Abandon Its Surveillance Plans | Electronic Frontier Foundation

apple with an eye in the center

“The features Apple announced a month ago, intending to help protect children, would create an infrastructure that is all too easy to redirect to greater surveillance and censorship. These features would create an enormous danger to iPhone users’ privacy and security, offering authoritarian governments a new mass surveillance system to spy on citizens. They also put already vulnerable kids at risk, especially LGBTQ youth, and create serious potential for danger to children in abusive households. The responses to Apple’s plans have been damning: over 90 organizations across the globe have urged the company not to implement them, for fear that they would lead to the censoring of protected speech, threaten the privacy and security of people around the world, and have disastrous consequences for many children.”

Source : Delays Aren’t Good Enough—Apple Must Abandon Its Surveillance Plans | Electronic Frontier Foundation

A Smart Lamp That Watches Kids When They Study Is a Hit in China

“The lamps come equipped with two built-in cameras—one facing the child and another offering a bird’s-eye view from above—letting parents remotely monitor their children when they study. There is a smartphone-sized screen attached to each lamp, which applies artificial intelligence to offer guidance on math problems and difficult words. And parents can hire a human proctor to digitally monitor their children as they study.In addition to the basic version of the lamp, a $170 upgraded model sends alerts and photos to parents when their children slouch. That version of the lamp sold out on China’s largest e-commerce platforms earlier this month.”

Source : A Smart Lamp That Watches Kids When They Study Is a Hit in China – WSJ

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